August 05, 2008
On Liberal Locusts and "Egalitarian" Elitists

Over on Crosscut David Brewster writes about the flow of Democrat voters into the heartland from coastal cities. He states that many of these workers are heading for "places with good schools, nearby fishing streams, and plenty of people like us." He continues that, among other characteristics they "yern for better schools". This last phrase got me thinking, these types of voters are a lot like locusts or other viral organisms that move from area to area, decimating the resources, in this case taking perfectly good schools that are run based on conservative values of family involvement and local control, and turning them into the institutions they just left.

Another very telling sentance from Brewster states that many of these folks are also leaving because of "High prices, high taxes, and some distaste for the swelling immigrant populations." If that isn't elitist enough he goes further to say that coastal cities like Seattle are "splitting into a wealthy class pleased at rising real estate values and an immigrant servant class."

The sad fact is Brewster is spot on. The good news is everything goes in cycles. Perhaps Jim McDermott won't be congressman-for-life.

Posted by MarkGriswold at August 05, 2008 07:40 AM | Email This
Comments
1. Demoncraps would also infest any new counties we would try to create. We have to retake the soviet cities like Seattle by boycotting their businesses, demonizing their politicians, continue sending in Christian missionaries to minister to their middle-class, and refusing to "debate" anything with their pseudo-intellectual ruling class.

Posted by: The Pirate on August 5, 2008 08:33 AM
2.
Seattle and the Puget Sound have long since priced themselves out of the market. The only way is down...down in price, down in population.

It will probably return to what it was like in the 1980s...a time capsule that remains "static" as the article says. You can already see signs that the area is mired in its glory days of the early 1990s and not really changing with the times...

Posted by: John Bailo on August 5, 2008 10:09 AM
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